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Local Focus – Caledon

Local Focus - Caledon

Living History

Caledon is a true community of communities that is spread over 700 square kilometres in the southern reaches of the Headwaters tourism area. Scenic countryside and quaint villages offer something for everyone, with outdoor pursuits like hiking and cycling a great way to enjoy its natural beauty.

The Town of Caledon was established in 1974 in conjunction with the creation of regional government. Representing an amalgamation of the former County of Peel townships of Albion, Caledon and the northern half of Chinguacousy, the town forms the northern municipality of the Region of Peel.

The County of Peel was created in 1805 following the purchase by the British Crown of the southern part of the Mississauga Tract on the shores of Lake Ontario.

The former townships of Albion, Caledon and Chinguacousy were opened for settlement in about 1820. Early settlements developed around water-powered mills on the Credit and Humber Rivers. The arrival of the railway in the 1870s spurred further settlements. While some of these historic hamlets have disappeared over time, Caledon’s present communities continue to reflect the early settlement patterns.

Cheltenham signpost

Cheltenham signpost

Today, Caledon is somewhat urban, but it is primarily rural. It’s major urban centre — and the primary administrative and commercial hub — is Bolton. Some of the smaller communities include Albion, Alloa, Alton, Belfountain, Boston Mills, Brimstone, Caledon, Caledon East, Caledon Village, Campbell’s Cross, Cataract, Cedar Meadows, Cedar Mills, Cheltenham, Forks of the Credit, The Grange, Humber, Humber Grove, Inglewood, Mayfield West, Melville, Mono Mills, Mono Road, New Glasgow, Palgrave, Queensgate, Sandhill, Silver Creek, Snelgrove, Stonehart, Terra Cotta, Tormore, Valleywood and Victoria. The region is otherwise very sparsely populated with farms being the only residential centres.

Caledon is an award-winning green community and offers a quality of life largely unmatched through the GTA.

Housing Options

Often considered a suburb of Brampton and Mississauga, most of the housing is single-family homes. There is a great selection of home types, from historic to modern.

To see a list of lowrise homes for sale, go here.

For a list of townhouse and condominium offerings, go here.

The Workplace

A vibrant “community of communities” that is home to nearly 60,000 residents, Caledon benefits from its strategic location in the Greater Toronto Area. As the GTA’s population continues to grow, there are thousands of people in close proximity of Caledon. This translates to an abundant and diverse labour force and employment pool. The primary administrative and commercial centre of Caledon is Bolton.

School Days

The Peel District School Board and the Dufferin-Peel Catholic School Board administer public and Catholic schools, while the The Counseil scolaire Viamonde operates secular Francophone schools and the Conseil scolaire de district catholique Centre-Sud operates Catholic Francophone in the area. There are also plenty of private school options.

Sheridan College in Brampton the closest post-secondary school option.

Essential Services

The William Osler Health System’s Brampton Civic Hospital is Caledon’s nearest large medical facility, while the Headwaters Health Care Centre in Orangeville is a medium-sized acute and complex continuing care facility with an emergency department.

Policing is handled by the Ontario Provincial Police and the town runs its own fire services through the all-volunteer Town of Caledon Fire & Emergency Services, which has nine stations.

Ambulance services are run by the Region of Peel.

Retail Therapy

In Caledon, shopping is more local, with small shops spread out through the various villages, although Bolton boasts a SmartCentre and many other big box stores. Large shopping centres can be found in nearby Brampton.

Leisure Pursuits

Fishing on the Credit River

Fishing on the Credit River

Caledon boasts a lot of great outdoor activity, including a wide variety of golf courses, picnic areas and trails to walk, hike or ride.

Caledon Equestrian Park

Caledon Equestrian Park

Dressage competition

Dressage competition

The township is a horse-lovers’ dream, home to the Caledon Equestrian Park in Palgrave that hosted the equestrian events of dressage, eventing and show jumping at the 2015 Pan Am/Parapan Games.

Alton Mills Art Centre

Alton Mills Art Centre

The Alton Mills Art Centre is an award-winning heritage building that is home to art galleries, a museum, café and shop. Exhibits are changed on a regular basis. Theatres include the Caledon Townhall Players and the Blackhourse Theatre. Every fall, the town celebrates with the Headwaters Arts Festival, which includes a juried show and sale, studio tours, literature reading, concerts and workshops.

Parks & Rec

The Bruce Trail, which winds its way along the Niagara Escarpment from Niagara to Tobermory, passes through Caledon and can be accessed from many connecting sites.

Cheltenham Badlands

Cheltenham Badlands

One curious feature in Caledon is the Cheltenham Badlands, which features exposed and eroded Queenston Shale. The formation is mostly red in colour due to iron oxide deposits with fain green streaks due to ground water percolation changing the red iron oxide into green iron oxide.

Belfountain Falls and Bridge

Belfountain Falls and Bridge

Forks of the Credit Provincial Park

Forks of the Credit Provincial Park

Caledon is also home to several conservation areas, including Albion Hills, Alton Forest, Belfountain, Caledon Lake Forest Conservation Area, Forks of the Credit Provincial Park, Glen Haffy Conservation Area, Ken Whillans Conservation Area, Palgrave Forest and Wildlife Area, Robert Baker Forest Conservation Area, Terra Cotta Conservation Area and Warwick Conservation Area. Caledon has an expansive trail system.

Easy Access

GO Transit operates two bus routes in Caledon. Brampton Transit has extended Route 30 Airport Road into the Tullamore Industrial Area within the Town of Caledon, with a total of six trips per day. The town currently has no government-supported local public transit system. Transit services for the elderly, disabled and infirm are provided by Caledon Community Services Transportation and Transhelp (run by Peel Region).

The area has many arterial highways, include Airport Road (Peel Regional Road 7), Hurontario Street or Highway 10, Charleston Sideroad (Peel Regional Road 24), Queen Street or Peel Regional Road 50, Main Street and Porterfield Road (Peel Regional Road 136 and Highway 410 to Highway 10.

caledon.ca